Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Two stars, three dimensions and oodles of energy! This double star system, located about 25,000 light years from Earth, erupted in an outburst that ejected an extraordinary amount of energy. It’s estimated that material weighing about one tenth of the Earth’s mass was ejected.

Lawsuit Reveals The NSA Received 29 “Extraterrestrial Messages” From Space, A Long Time Ago

Lawsuit Reveals The NSA Received 29 “Extraterrestrial Messages” From Space, A Long Time Ago

What made this flare so 'radioactive'? Why hasn't it stopped?


What made this flare so 'radioactive'? It has to do with the location of AR2673 at the time of the explosion. The sun's western limb is magnetically well-connected to Earth. Look at this diagram. Magnetic fields spiraling back from the blast site led directly to our planet, funneling these energetic protons Earthward.

Normally, solar radiation storms are held at bay by our planet's magnetic field and upper atmosphere. On Sept.10th, however, there was a "ground level event" (GLE). Neutron monitors in the Arctic, Antarctic, and several other high latitude locations detected a surge of particles reaching all the way down to Earth's surface:


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The Bartol Research Institute's South Pole Neutron Monitor detected a GLE on Sept. 10th.

""In historical terms, this was a relatively small ground level event-- only about one thousandth as strong as the event of 23 Feb 1956, which is the largest measured," says Clive Dyer, a Visiting Professor at the University of Surrey Space Centre.

However, that does not mean the Sept.10th GLE was negligible. Dyer says that "passengers flying on high-latitude routes at 40,000 feet could have absorbed an extra 10 microSieverts of radiation. During the first hour of the GLE, the dose rate inside the aircraft during such a flight would have approximately doubled."

He also notes that the GLE could have caused minor upsets of onboard electronics and avionics, although nothing on the scale of the epic 1956 GLE, "which would be very challenging to modern systems."

"Since measurements began around 1942 there have now been 73 events detected by ground level radiation monitors," Dyer adds. "The Sept.10, 2017, event is far from the strongest, but it is of special interest because it demonstrates the need for continual vigilance even during Solar Minimum."